Sailing Nakamal

Engine hoisting

Strength optional (thank goodness)

Last week and this week we sailed Nakamal across the South Bay to Glorietta Bay on Coronado Island. It wasn’t a long trip, just a few miles but we had three goals:

  1. Practice anchoring (i.e. being “on the hook”)
  2. Practice raising and lowering the dinghy engine
  3. Eat and drink on Coronado

We also made a passage checklist so we pretended like we were going an actual voyage instead of a couple hours across the bay to make sure we didn’t miss any important prep steps (like fill up the fuel and water before taking off to Mexico).

We put the table up when underway. Don't want to risk losing the liquor!

We put the table up when underway. Don’t want to risk losing the liquor!

This was our second anchoring practice, last week we went over for a couple of nights, this time just one night but you raise and lower the anchor the same time of times (ideally once each) regardless of how many nights you swing on the hook.

First, we buttoned up the interior and prepped the cockpit and deck as if we would be at sea for a couple days. We’ve been doing this all along anyway so we have the routine down pretty good.

Next we anchored. After last week’s debacle with the jammed windlass, I am now at the wheel and John is in charge of the anchor. I think this will work better anyway because now he can see what’s going on up there instead of asking me what’s going on.

The anchor locker at the foot of our bed ready.

The anchor locker at the foot of our bed ready.

Once set, we lifted the dinghy engine from its resting place on Nakamal’s shoulder (ok, rail) down to the dinghy. There’s a special dinghy holder thing. I’m sure it has name, everything on the boat has a special name. It’s like another language. I told John I could learn Spanish, or Boat – pick one.

After the dingy was powered up, we putzed around for the evening. Eating and drinking we accomplished at Bluewater Grill’s happy hour ($4 beers, $5 wine and we can highly recommend the fish tacos, ahi poke and calamari fritter to make a complete dinner for two). The next morning we reversed the engine hoisting and anchoring processes to return home to Chula Vista Marina.

We are getting pretty good at doing the engine hoisting thing in a calm, peaceful, still bay – once we are cruising it will be more challenging as the water will be rocking us more. But like a good quarterback – receiver duo, we are getting the fundamentals down first. I’ll let the pictures tell the rest of the story.

Step 1: tie on the safety line.

Step 1: Tie on the safety line and unclamp from the dinghy. The safety line is a back up in case the hoisting line breaks. It’s purpose is to save the engine from sinking to the bottom of the ocean.

Step 2: I start hoisting the engine off the dinghy.

Step 2: I start hoisting the engine off the dinghy.

4PulledToTheTop

Step 3: I hoist until the hooky thing is all the way to the top of the pulleys. The Captain installed a triple pulley so that I could hoist it even with my limited upper body strength.

Step 4: At the top, I hold it to keep it from swinging against the boat while John comes up to finish.

Step 4: At the top, I hold it to keep it from swinging against the boat while John comes up to finish.

The Captain completes the lift onto the holder thingy and clamps the engine onto it.

Step 5: The Captain completes the lift onto the special dinghy engine holder and clamps the engine onto it.

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This entry was published on October 15, 2015 at 5:46 pm and is filed under Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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